Skip to main content

Access Chapter 1

Chapter Demonstrable Skills

After completing the Access Chapter 1 portion of the Access unit, students will be able to:

Demonstrable Skill Learning Activities
& Informal Assessments
Formal Assessments
(excluding Exams)
Identify real-world uses of databases.
  • Access: Database Design Participation Project
Create, edit, and delete records.
  • Access: Access Basics Participation Project
  • Access: Database Creation Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson C
  • Homework #4
  • Homework #5
  • MyLab Lesson C
Use the sort and filter tools to organize information in Datasheet View.
  • MyLab Lesson C
  • MyLab Lesson C
Determine whether Access databases or Excel spreadsheets are more suitable for use with a dataset.
  • Access: Database Design Participation Project
Manage databases including creating, opening, and saving files.
  • Access: Access Basics Participation Project
  • Access: Database Creation Participation Project
  • Access: Fields & Keys Participation Project
  • Access: Forms Participation Project
  • Access: Queries I Participation Project
  • Access: Queries II Participation Project
  • Access: Queries III Participation Project
  • Access: Queries IV Participation Project
  • Access: Reports Participation Project
  • Access: SQL Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson C
  • Homework #4
  • Homework #5
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson C
Use the Compact and Repair Database tool.
  • Access: Access Basics Participation Project
  • Access: Database Creation Participation Project
  • Access: Fields & Keys Participation Project
  • Access: Forms Participation Project
  • Access: Queries I Participation Project
  • Access: Queries II Participation Project
  • Access: Queries III Participation Project
  • Access: Queries IV Participation Project
  • Access: Reports Participation Project
  • Access: SQL Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson C
  • Homework #4
  • Homework #5
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson C

Chapter Notes

The parts of an Access database

An Access database is a structured collection of objects [1]. Objects are both created and needed in order for the database to function.

There are six main object types in an Access database. There are four objects that are commonly used:

  • A table is the foundation of every database. Data is stored in a table. Tables organize data into columns and rows. Columns display information in fields, while each row contains a record. A complete set of all fields in the table is a record.
  • A form allows the user to enter, modify, or delete table data. A form can be created to limit the user to viewing only one record at a time,unlike a table. The user can then focus on the data that is being entered or modified.
  • A query is a question that you ask about the data. The results are displayed in the query. The query can be used to display only records that meet a certain conditions and only in certain fields. A query can also be used to update or delete records as well.
  • A report consists of information from tables and queries. The information can be formatted to be presented in a professional manner. Reports can be printed.

Filtering

A filter displays a subset of records based on specified criteria [1]. Criteria can be a number, a text phrase, or an expression used to select records form a table. Filters analyze data quickly. Filters do not delete records, filters only hide records that do not match the criteria.

There are two types of filters.

  • Filter by Selection displays only records that match selection criteria.
  • Filter by Form displays records based on multiple criteria.

Sorting

Access provides tools to change the order of information. A sort lists records in a specific sequence [1].

  • Ascending sorts text data in alphabetical order or numbers from lowest to highest.
  • Descending sorts text data in reverse alphabetical order or numbers from highest to lowest.

Access can sort records by more than one field. This is done by first sorting the column on the left. Then the column on the right is sorted. When sorting multiple records, the columns must be arranged in this order.

Tips & Tricks

Design View

When you're in Design View, you need to think about a few things [2]:

  • Primary key (be sure to hit the button making something a primary key). That key has to be unique.
  • Short text - normal choice, up to 255 characters
  • Number-The default type is Integer. If you need to enter a decimal, pick Double for the number type and set the number of decimal places.
  • Lookup wizard-Displays as field type "lookup wizard" until you finish the wizard.

Relationships

You must create relationships between similar fields (i.e. relate First Name to First Name or Student ID to Student ID) [2]. The field types must match (Number to Number, Text to Text). It's best to relate empty fields, but you won't always be able to do that. Pay attention to errors. Close all other tables before you start a relationship.

References

  1. A. Poatsy, K. Mulberry, C. Krebs, L. Hogan, A. Rutledge, and E. Cameron, Exploring Microsoft Office 2013, 1st ed., vol. 1. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2013.
  2. R. G. Phipps and B. M. Powell, “Access Chapter 1,” Computer Science 101, May 18, 2016. Available: http://cs101.wvu.edu/materials/units/access/access-chapter-1/.