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Word Chapter 2

Chapter Demonstrable Skills

After completing the Word Chapter 2 portion of the Word & PowerPoint unit, students will be able to:

Demonstrable Skill Learning Activities
& Informal Assessments
Formal Assessments
(excluding Exams)
Adjust paragraph spacing, line spacing, indentation, and alignment.
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Control tab stops.
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F
Use bulleted and numbered lists.
  • Word: Layout & Pagination Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
Apply column formatting.
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F
Use formatting styles.
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Create and modify formatting styles.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Create section breaks.
  • Word: Layout & Pagination Participation Project
Insert pictures in documents.
  • Data Analysis: Online Scavenger Hunt Participation Project
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Resize, move, align, and crop pictures.
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Specify font settings such as font, size, color, bold, italics, and underline.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • Word: Styles & Illustrations Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson G
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson G
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Apply borders and shading.
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F

Chapter Notes

Line spacing

Line spacing controls the amount of space between each line of text [1]. The default spacing varies between versions of Word (it is 1.5 in Word 2013), but other options such as single-spacing and double-spacing can be used as well.

Indents

An indent involves setting the edge of a paragraph in from the margin [1]. The most common is the first line indent, in which the first line of each paragraph is set off from the left margin.

Tab stops

A tab is a marker that specifies a position for aligning text. By using tabs, you can easily arrange text in columns or position text a certain distance from the left or right margins [1]. You can select from various types of tabs, with the most common being left, right, center, and decimal. By default, a left tab is set every 0.5-inches when you start a document.

Bulleted and numbered lists

A list organizes information by topic or in a sequence [1]. You use a numbered list if the list is a sequence of steps. If the list is not of a sequential nature, but is a simple itemization of points, you use a bulleted list. A multilevel list extends a numbered or bulleted list to several levels. 

Formatting styles

A style is a named collection of formatting characteristics [1]. Styles automate the formatting process and provide a consistent appearance to a document. A character style formats one or more selected characters within a paragraph. A paragraph style changes the entire paragraph in which the insertion point is located, or changes multiple selected paragraphs. The Styles are shown in the Styles group of the Home ribbon.

Section breaks

A section break is a marker that divides a document into sections [1]. Word stores the formatting characteristics of each section within the section break a the end of a section. Therefore, if you delete a section break, you also delete the formatting for that section, causing the text above the break to assume the formatting characteristics of the previous sections. You can choose from four types of sections breaks. You can insert a section break type on the Page Layout ribbon. Before inserting a break, the insertion point should be at the point where the break is to occur.

References

  1. A. Poatsy, K. Mulberry, C. Krebs, L. Hogan, A. Rutledge, and E. Cameron, Exploring Microsoft Office 2013, 1st ed., vol. 1. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2013.