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Word Chapter 4

Chapter Demonstrable Skills

After completing the Word Chapter 4 portion of the Word & PowerPoint unit, students will be able to:

Demonstrable Skill Learning Activities
& Informal Assessments
Formal Assessments
(excluding Exams)
Specify citation sources.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Insert citations in a document.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson G
  • MyLab Lesson G
Insert and format bibliographies.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Create footnotes and endnotes.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F
Create Tables of Contents.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
Mark index entries and create an index.
Insert cover pages.
  • Word: Layout & Pagination Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • Homework #6
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Bonus Project #2
Track and review document changes and comments.
  • Word: References & Workflow Participation Project
  • MyLab Lesson F
  • MyLab Lesson F

Chapter Notes

Cover pages

To insert a cover page, click on the Insert ribbon and then select Cover Page. You will see a drop-down menu that presents a variety of templates. The Office template gallery online also presents additional options [2].

Bibliography sources

A citation should appear near a source of reference without interrupting the flow of a sentence [1]. Citations are typically placed before a punctuation mark that ends a sentence. As you create a citation, you will either add a new source or select a previously defined source as the reference. A cited reference includes the type of source, title, publisher, page number(s), and other items specific to the type of source.

When you create a source, it is available for use in the current document and saved in the document’s Current List of sources. It is also placed in the Master List, which is a database of all sources created in Word on a particular computer.

Bibliographies

A bibliography is a list of documents or sources consulted by an author during research for a paper [1]. It not only guides a reader to sources of your research for additional study, but it provides a reader with an opportunity to validate references for accuracy.

Word includes in a bibliography (or works cited page) only those sources that were cited in the paper. You can find the Insert Bibliography button on the References ribbon.

Footnotes and Endnotes

Footnotes and endnotes are used to provide additional information about an item mentioned in the main text [1]. A footnote is automatically positioned at the end of the page, with the same superscript as that assigned to the in-text reference. An endnote is automatically positioned sequentially with other endnotes on a page at the end of the document.

Tables of Contents

A table of contents lists headings in the order they appear in a document, along with the page numbers on which the entries begin [1]. The key to enabling Word to create a table of contents is to apply heading styles to headings in the document at appropriate levels. When inserting tables of contents, you can set them to either automatically update when changes are made or require them to be manually updated.

Tracking changes

Many people work together while planning, developing, writing, and editing important documents. A large part of the process is reviewing work begun or submitted by others. In reviewing a document, you may want to change wording, edit the format, or make a comment. Word provides a way to make comments, reply to comments, and track changes that might have been made to a document by others during the review process.

The Review ribbon includes options related to comments and tracking changes. When All Markup view is selected, all replies to original comments are indented beneath the original which makes it easy to follow the progression of a comment.

When Track Changes is not enabled, any change made to a document is untraceable. When Track changes is enabled and All Markup view is selected, revision marks are applied where a person added, deleted, or formatted text.  In addition, a bar displays on the left side of any paragraph in which edits occurred [1].

References

  1. A. Poatsy, K. Mulberry, C. Krebs, L. Hogan, A. Rutledge, and E. Cameron, Exploring Microsoft Office 2013, 1st ed., vol. 1. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2013.
  2. R. G. Phipps and B. M. Powell, “Word Chapter 4,” Computer Science 101, May 18, 2016. Available: http://cs101.wvu.edu/materials/units/word-powerpoint/word-chapter-4/.